Love works every. time.

alex and me

Wanna know the power you have in the universe?

Wondering if a village can move a mountain?

Unsure about whether every prayer and intention is truly heard and answered?

Read on and wonder no more:
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ALEX IS STAYING AT HIS CURRENT RESIDENTIAL PLACEMENT!!
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We did it! 
All the love and support, prayers and good vibes you all have poured into the world over the last few months have worked.
Mountains have moved, obstacles have vanished. 
The decision-makers and clincians involved have been inspired to find better, more creative solutions than moving Alex, because keeping him near his family is simply the right thing to do.
I am so grateful to you and to everyone at Alex’s placement.  
Thank you, thank you, thank you for believing in my boy and giving him the chance to create his success story in the environment that can make it happen!
WOOHOO!
God is GOOD!!!

 

I WANT MY BOY BACK!

Mostly I write when I am inspired or feeling strong and defiant, ready to take on the autism-bad and replace it with hope and quirky-good.  To conquer fear, doubt, shame, guilt and win.  Today, however, I am writing to throw one big freaking temper tantrum.  Ready?  This is me screaming to the universe:

I WANT MY BOY BACK!! 

It is not fair, God!  Not fair!  I don’t know what you’re playing at or why you chose me, but I sure as hell am ANGRY at you today.

We have been flexible, we have been compliant, we are following the rules– insurance rules, treatment recommendation rules, societal rules.  Alex is now living at a new residential treatment facility.  His father and I have confidence in the new treatment team and the staff.  We are optimistic that with their guidance, Alex can learn to control his aggressive and violent behaviors and be able to live at home with us. 

Once again, we’ve made the transition to something new, something “better.”  We have taken the please-give-us-hope-because-we-are-beaten-down-and-we-don’t-know-what-else-to-do-for-our-precious-son option.  Yet again.

Things have gone well so far with the new place.  The treatment team cautiously advised that they will help Alex learn to control his behavior and aggression to a reasonable degree, we can’t expect perfection.  I stated I could handle anything about the autism, anything about the plan.  Just not violence toward me or his sister. 

Agitation?  Fine.  Screaming?  Fine.  Non-compliance that doesn’t lead to dangerous situations?  Fine. 

But not the violent lashing out, not the glazed-over rage and intense physical aggression.  No more blood, no more deep bruises that turn 17 colors before finally fading into a semblance of age spots on my hands and arms. 

No more.

We had a good visit on Sunday.  Alex was troubled earlier in the day by having to return to his dorm after his first overnight with his dad in a month.  He wasn’t particularly content when I arrived, but I could tell he was glad to see me and Hannah.  During the first two hours of our visit, I knew that Alex was at least comforted by our presence, and at least mostly enjoying our activities.  We talked and interacted, Alex listened to me and responded, we were allies.

After running around the playground acting silly, we returned to Alex’s dorm for a quick break so the girls could use the bathroom.  Another resident was crying and screaming:

“I want to go home, I want to go home.” 

Alex wants to go home too.  He reacted with screams.  When Hannah and I finished in the bathroom and returned to Alex, he was sitting relatively calmly with his staff.  It was clear he was still upset by the plight of his friend, but he appeared to be handling things okay. 

Without thinking, I approached him and leaned over close to talk to him. 

I said someone would help his friend, that the staff were all working to help his friend be okay, and that the best thing we could do was to have safe hands and be calm.  Things I’d said a hundred times before over the last year.  Alex listened, he leaned his head next to mine and seemed to breathe easier.  I kissed his hair.

I felt safe and confident, being so close, because I knew we were on the same page and he trusted me. 

I knew he was agitated, but I thought the worst was over.  I felt like the mom I’m supposed to be, the one kids turn to when they want to talk or when they’re confused or sad.  I kept talking to Alex in a reassuring voice.  We were together in this moment and our situation (the day, the living arrangement, the vibe) wasn’t ideal, but we were okay together.

I got that wrong I guess. 

Maybe everything was wrong and I didn’t see.  Something must have been terribly off about my perceptions because what happened next came out of the blue and was bad.  Alex stabbed me in the face with a pen just under my left eye.  He drew blood.  Another half inch higher and I could have lost my sight.  I had seen the pen on the table, but didn’t think twice about it.  I hadn’t been scared, I thought I knew he wouldn’t do anything to hurt me.  For the first time in a year, I had been so blissfully ignorant of the danger. 

I’d felt like we were back to the mother-son relationship we used to have– the time when I felt confident enough to tackle anything, when our daily circumstances could be less than ideal but we could be together and working on it and it would be enough.

Today I am sad, I am angry.  Today I hate autism.  I hate “intermittent explosive disorder” and every other name that childhood violence is called.  I hate feeling traumatized and out-of-control after a simple visit with my children to the playground. 

But what hurts the most is that I yearn to feel safe and protected, and yet I don’t want to be protected from this. 

I don’t want someone to “keep me safe” from my son.  I don’t want to have to watch for the pens on the table, to be an arm’s length away.   I want to be able to kiss Alex’s hair and talk gently to him and be where he is.  I want to do what I know how to do– to merge my “clinical” skills and my “mom” skills and just be the mother I was born to be to this one particular boy.  My boy.  I don’t want anyone to move me out of harm’s way. 

I want the autism to go.

I JUST WANT MY BOY BACK!

the mom i was